Areejit Samal

At present, I am Reader F in the Computational Biology group of the The Institute of Mathematical Sciences (IMSc), Chennai, India. IMSc is a constituent institution of the Homi Bhabha National Institute (HBNI), Mumbai, India. I am also a Ramanujan Fellow of the Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB), Department of Science and Technology (DST), India, Head of a Max Planck Partner Group in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig, Germany, and Simons Associate of the International Centre of Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy.

My trajectory

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I was born in Cuttack, Odisha, India and spent my first 7 years in a small industrial township Joda in Odisha. With my parents, I then moved to Kodarma in Jharkhand (formerly Bihar) for 2 years. In 1989, I moved to Delhi with my parents and settled there for next 20 years. In Delhi, I completed my Schooling, Bachelors, Masters and PhD. In May 2008, I moved to Leipzig, Germany for my Postdoctoral work. In March 2010, I shifted my base to Orsay (suburb of Paris). Between, March 2010 and February 2012, I kept shuttling between Paris and Leipzig. In February 2012, I moved to Seattle, USA. In March 2013, I moved to Trieste, Italy to continue my research. I returned to India in 2014.

Recent News

Poster Prize to B.S. Karthikeyan at India International Science Festival (IISF) 2019

B.S. Karthikeyan, Research Associate in the group, presented a poster on our work on endocrine disruptors at the Young Scientists Conference (YSC), IISF 2019 held in Kolkata. His poster won the second prize in the theme Swasth Bharat.

Best Poster Prize to B.S. Karthikeyan at Society of Biological Chemists (SBCI) 2019

B.S. Karthikeyan, Research Associate in the group, presented a poster on our work on endocrine disruptors at SBCI 2019 organised by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai. His poster was adjudged to be the best poster at the meeting.

Database of endocrine disruptors focuses on experimental evidence

Analysis of substances suggests no correlation between chemical structure and biological effects.

Indian team identifies hundreds of potential EDCs from literature

Researchers in India have identified 686 potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by searching and analysing the available literature. Most of the potential EDCs are used in consumer products, with evidence for adverse reproductive or metabolic effects.

Indian scientists develop database of everyday chemicals harmful to human health

In our daily lives, we get exposed to dozens of chemicals either through products we use or consume as well as through exposure to the environment. Such chemicals are present in consumer products, pesticides and insecticides, cosmetics, drugs...

Now, a database of harmful chemicals in everyday items

Ingredients in your everyday items may have an adverse effect on your body. Chennai-based Institute of Mathematical Sciences (IMSc) has created an online database — Database of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals...