Program

4:00 PM - 4:45 PM Shannon Olsson, National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR, Bengaluru
Connecting with nature
4:45 PM - 5:30 PM Harinath Chakrapani, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Chemical darts to find antibacterial targets
5:30 PM - 6:00 PMRefreshment Break
6:00 PM - 6:45 PMV Madhurima, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Thiruvarur
A balancing act: Appreciating dance through understanding motion
6:45 PM - 7:30 PMR Ramanujam, The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai
Looking for logic in social practice

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Speakers

Shannon Olsson
National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR, Bengaluru

Connecting with nature

We humans crave connection. It is one of the most fundamental aspects of Life. In fact, all living organisms on Earth are connected to one another through the language of chemistry. These chemical conversations create a vast interplay of interactions that maintain the stability of our ecosystems. However, humanity is changing the conversation. Today, we are altering this planet and its interactions more than any single species in the history of Earth. I will discuss nature’s changing communication in the Indian context, particularly concerning pollination, environmental change, and urban pollution. I believe that the solutions to these problems lie within all of us. To what makes us part of Life itself: our connectedness. Let’s start the conversation together.

Harinath Chakrapani
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune

Chemical darts to find antibacterial targets

Antibiotics are among the greatest discoveries in the past century. However, antimicrobial drug resistance, particularly resistance to these antibiotics, has emerged as a major global health problem. I will discuss some of the approaches that my lab has taken to identify vulnerabilities in drug-resistant bacteria.

V Madhurima
Central University of Tamil Nadu, Thir uvarur

A balancing act: Appreciating dance through understanding motion

Our love and appreciation of dance is derived from our understanding of culture, history and religious practices. The joy associated with this appreciation is further enhanced by viewing the art form through the lens of science. Though the subjective aspects of dance cannot be discussed from a typical scientific perspective, the objective aspects of dance can be analysed using the laws of physics. Hence while dance is still an aesthetic experience for both the dancer and the viewer, the rasikatva of the rasika can be enhanced through an understanding of movement, much the same as understanding the concept of swaras helps in appreciating music and that of the working of a camera in photography.

In this talk I will be discussing the laws of physics that govern basic human movements and extended then to understand movements of dance. Through this I will discuss, for example, the role of various “sthanas” in the execution of adavus and karanas. A comparison between the “chakkars” of Kathak and the pirouettes of western classical dance will be made, with respect to the physics of rotational motion.

R Ramanujam
The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai

Looking for logic in social practice

There are many algorithms implicit or explicit in the way society works: for example, an election, or a queue where lunch is served. These algorithms rely on logical properties of underlying physical and social structures. For instance, in an election, we not only want confidentiality but also verifiability (that every vote cast has been counted), and many more such properties. Can we prove that these requirements are consistent?

Societal algorithms require a careful study of underlying logical reasoning. Many insights from mathematical logic, computer science, game theory and dynamical systems theory seem useful for such exploration.

Poster Exhibition: Deep History Sites of the Indian Subcontinent

An exhibition in the foyer of the Music Academy during 3-8 pm on the day of the event (Sunday, 16th Feb 2020) will highlight some important prehistoric sites in the Indian subcontinent. All registrants are invited to view this exhibition.

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Registration Form.

The registration for the event is now closed. However, you are still welcome to show up directly at the venue (Music Academy, TTK Auditorium) today (Sunday Feb 16th). The e vent is scheduled to start at 4.00pm. After 3.50pm, we will allow walk-ins, depending upon space being available (which we guess there should be). Thank you for your interest in the event.
Extra parking (3--8pm): St. Ebbas Girls Higher Secondary School (across the road to the East)



Instructions to the participants

Entry to the exibition in the foyer opens at 3:00 pm. Auditorium doors open at 3:30 pm. Please be seated by 3:45 pm. After that time, we will start letting in walk-in participants.

Extra parking (3--8 pm) is available at St. Ebbas Girls Higher Secondary School (across the road to the East).

To enter the hall, just show the QRCode (preferred option) sent by us or quote your email address or produce a printout of this email.

Have a question for any of the speakers?
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Or tweet: @scisabha, #SatS2020
Or SMS: 9445844122

Selected questions will be answered by the speakers on stage!